Fenton InPrint Online

Fast Fashion and Ethical Brands

Hannah Young, Writer

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Fast Fashion is a term used in the fashion industry when replications from runway trends are presented to the public almost instantly after being shown. Created with low-quality materials and inexpensive fashion to mask the fast pace of trends. Ethical brands make a point to use environmentally safe materials when designing their lines.
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Patagonia uses recycled materials and organic cotton. It also uses Fair Trade Certified factories in countries such as India, Sri Lanka and Los Angeles,California. They make both male and female outdoor wear, swimwear and apparel. They also use recycled polyester in their backpacks and clothing.

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The Girlfriend Collective is an athleisure collection that utilizes sustainable materials in their clothing. Each of their original leggings are made from recycled bottles. The company also sells tees that are made from a cotton waste.

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Adidas and Parley have come together to create shoes out of recycled water bottles before they have a chance to enter the ocean. Their colors mimic those of the ocean with greens and blues.

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Thought Clothing is a brand that uses organic cotton and sustainable fabrics. The brand is comprised of both women and men’s apparel plus accessories.

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Whimsy + Row is based out of California. The company uses deadstock materials– the leftover materials companies went without using. The company also uses fair labor standards and limits the run of batches of clothing. These standards establish a minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor laws.

PHOTO COURTESY: Google Images

Mayamiko is a London based company. They are Fair Trade Certified and PETA-approved vegan certified. The company is best known for its colorful prints and ethnic clothing. Their products range from women’s apparel to accessories and uses organic lines while focusing on women empowerment.

**For more info on Fast Fashion read “Disposable but Damaging” in the December 2018 issue of the Fenton InPrint. 

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