Top five re-readable books

Gracie Warda, Online Editor in Chief

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There are some books that are only enjoyable the first time around, but there are other books that capture a reader’s heart read after read after read. See below for 5 books—that you might have already read— that are just as good the second (and third…) time around. 

“Wonder” by R.J. Palacio

“Wonder” is an extraordinary novel about a fifth grader named August Pullman with Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS), which leaves him with deformations. It is a heartwarming tale about his transition into middle school and the difficulties he faces, and leaves readers with a feel-good sensation every time around. 

The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

All of the Harry Potter books are arguably better re-read than they are the first time around. Re-reading about the adventures of Harry Potter and his peers in the magical universe allows audiences to pick up on foreshadowing and other details they might have missed initially.

“The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien

If fantasy is more your speed, “The Hobbit” is a great choice for a re-read. It follows the expedition of Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit in the “Lord of the Rings” realm. It is a somewhat complex book, so it’s easy to miss important details when reading it a single time. A re-read is a great opportunity for readers to enjoy the full story.

“All The Bright Places” by Jennifer Niven

This heartbreaking tale follows a romance between two teenagers: Finch and Violet. Not only is it a fantastic book, but similar to the Harry Potter series, re-reading it can show the audience subtle foreshadowing and details that went unnoticed during the first read.

“The Lord of the Flies” by William Golding

It is a classic for a reason— “The Lord of the Flies” shows how civilized children can turn into savages when left on a deserted island. It seems that every re-read of this book gives audiences a list of new motifs to analyze. From the Freudian Theory of Personality to democratic government, try to find every topic explored in this novel.