Fenton High’s virtual learning plan

Fenton+High%27s+virtual+learning+plan

Emmy Johnson, Writer

COVID-19 has swept the globe causing a mandatory stay-at-home order to be put in place. FHS has switched to teaching students online, like many other schools in the United States, making the faculty explore new ways to ensure students are getting the education and resources they need.

In early April, when schools were shut down in Michigan indefinitely, FHS provided a quick response to continue teaching on Google Classroom and allowing students to pick up any materials from their lockers before the building closed. That happened approximately two months ago, and now FHS has a statement on how school will continue for the remainder of the year.

“My initial reaction to school closing indefinitely was concern, while I see the benefit for online education and in these circumstances we must resort to it.” English teacher Brett Mead said. “Nothing will beat a dedicated teacher whose concern isn’t just academic purposes but also the well-being of students.”

Fenton High’s goal is to make sure that the student body is comfortable while finishing the remainder of the school year and prepared for the upcoming 2020-2021 school year. Making necessary changes to make sure of that.

One of these changes is S/U grading, better known as Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory grading. This will make grading for the remainder of the semester easier and more efficient. Grades on StudentVue will be checked “Satisfactory” for a C- and up and “Unsatisfactory” for C- and down. The idea behind it is for students to know what grades and subjects to work on so they can better them before grade books are closed.

Within the first week of online learning, teachers made adjustments to posting schedules and teaching techniques to make sure students get their work done on time.

“I’ve noticed my students begin their day at noon, so to make sure they see my Classroom notifications I’ve started posting assignments at noon while working with the schools established schedule.” Heather Mulligan, an English teacher at FHS, said.

Teachers are also putting due dates on assignments to ensure students are on track to completing the school year and graduating. While some teachers don’t mark assignments late, it helps teachers and the student body keep an organized schedule following the due dates given.

Despite these changes and new outlook on learning, it can be said that the teachers and student body at FHS are finishing the year off strong.